Eton or Orphanage?

Beebo

Senior Member
How can it cost between £3000 to £10000 per week to house children in council care.
Eton’s fees are around £1500 per week and I bet it’s far nicer at Eton.
I’m sure there are a small number of children with very complex needs which could be expensive, but most will be fairly ordinary kids who had a rough start in life.

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-60676971

Someone is making a fortune at our expense. It would be interesting to know who owns the homes.
 

Milkfloat

Active Member
As far as I am aware and as the article states - the £3K a week is for outliers of kids with really complex needs, the cost for kids without those needs are far lower. However, I agree ideally this would be council run and not companies making large profits. I have no problem with not-for-profit companies taking on specialised work that the council cannot do efficiently, but where the sole purpose is to make money is something that makes me uneasy.
 
OP
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Beebo

Beebo

Senior Member
I read it as £3k was the standard cost of a child in a children’s home and up to £10k was the cost for specialist services.
I could be wrong, it does sound very expensive.
Old people’s homes tend to charge circa £1500 a week. Is it harder to look after the elderly or the young?
 

BoldonLad

Old man on a bike. Not a member of a clique.
Location
South Tyneside
How can it cost between £3000 to £10000 per week to house children in council care.
Eton’s fees are around £1500 per week and I bet it’s far nicer at Eton.
I’m sure there are a small number of children with very complex needs which could be expensive, but most will be fairly ordinary kids who had a rough start in life.

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-60676971

Someone is making a fortune at our expense. It would be interesting to know who owns the homes.

Send all of the children in care to Eton, would appear to be the Accountants solution.
 

FishFright

Well-Known Member
How can it cost between £3000 to £10000 per week to house children in council care.
Eton’s fees are around £1500 per week and I bet it’s far nicer at Eton.
I’m sure there are a small number of children with very complex needs which could be expensive, but most will be fairly ordinary kids who had a rough start in life.

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-60676971

Someone is making a fortune at our expense. It would be interesting to know who owns the homes.

The £1,500 cost at Eton is the basic price withot extra's and pretty much everything outside board, lodgings and teaching time is a extra.

A long time ago I was offered a 'full' scholarship at a local public school as a week day boarder but just the basic extra's was a fair percentage of my dad's wage.
 

stephec

Regular
The £1,500 cost at Eton is the basic price withot extra's and pretty much everything outside board, lodgings and teaching time is a extra.

A long time ago I was offered a 'full' scholarship at a local public school as a week day boarder but just the basic extra's was a fair percentage of my dad's wage.
We had a similar thing when our lad passed the entrance tests for Bolton School, the basic fees soon expanded when you factored in school uniform, sports kit, the geography field trip to Guatemala, etc.

And then there was his younger sister as well......
 

slowmotion

Active Member
A brief thrash around on Google reveals that a foster parent might get paid between £300 and 700 per week for a child, depending on their behaviour/needs. Even my dodgy maths tells me that the monthly cost never comes close to £3-9k per month. Are public sector pensions that generous?
 

Adam4868

Legendary Member
A brief thrash around on Google reveals that a foster parent might get paid between £300 and 700 per week for a child, depending on their behaviour/needs. Even my dodgy maths tells me that the monthly cost never comes close to £3-9k per month. Are public sector pensions that generous?
How do you come to the 9k a month figure
Even 300 quid a week doesn't come to 3 k a month ?
 

icowden

Über Member
How can it cost between £3000 to £10000 per week to house children in council care.
Eton’s fees are around £1500 per week and I bet it’s far nicer at Eton.

Hmmm....

Eton's fees are 14,688 per half. That gives us 88188 for 36 weeks. So that's £2449, but that includes tuition, board, lodging, educational materials and games activities.

Still cheaper than private council care according to the article though which states:-

But the council says independent providers can charge anywhere between £3,500 a week to more than £10,000 for each child, depending on the complexity of their needs. Unlike in council homes, children can sometimes be asked to leave private homes with only a few hours' notice.

So yes - to me that sounds excessive.
 

dutchguylivingintheuk

Well-Known Member
I read it as £3k was the standard cost of a child in a children’s home and up to £10k was the cost for specialist services.
I could be wrong, it does sound very expensive.
Old people’s homes tend to charge circa £1500 a week. Is it harder to look after the elderly or the young?
You think 24/7 specially trained empoyees and the Ferrari of the boss pay from themselves?
 

dutchguylivingintheuk

Well-Known Member
It's the consequences of privatisation.
No it's the consequences of privatisation without demands then you get a consultancy like society with consultants recommending other consultants and so further and so forth. In an normal ''private'' economy companies who are run like this won't survive because they can't be competitive. But because the government just pays the bill they get away with it. It's by no means simple to solve issues like this, but it's living in the past to think it can be solved by bringing it back under goverment control.

In the Netherlands they ''give'' a personal budget to the patient that is then managed on their behalf that works well sometimes and sometimes not. When my nephew was still with us it worked quite well it allowed his parents to hire professionals and budget money for all kinds of other things, but that was a situation where as there where persons available acting on his behalf(edit clarification action on his behalf with only his interest in mind as parents typically do), however where is still goes wrong with this system is when the person in need of this help doesn't have an person (anymore) to hire professionals providing care act. because then it's placed upon the council or care home who in turn often use a company leading to the situation where discussion here, money being shoved around making the care more expensive than it should be. Edit to add that often happens there are however still a few of these companies who are proving this care in the way it's meant to be.
 
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