GBeebies

Tanis8472

Regular
Hah, ask paley!
😆
 

Pale Rider

Well-Known Member
Some of this is a bit trade anoraky, but GB News is a fascinating example of how news is broadcast in the digital age.

Time was, if you had a telly channel you either had viewers or you did not.

These days, it's all about digital engagement.

As GB News Head of Digital Rebecca Hutson says in the linked article: "I like to think of GB News as a digital media company with a news channel attached."

Thus success is judged over all platforms, including social media.

That doesn't apply just to GB News, you may have noticed Sky, particularly Sky Sports, is pushing its YouTube channel heavily.

Even dear old Auntie, which doesn't have the same commercial imperative, puts stuff on the tube, and staff almost have to have a social media presence.

Going back to GB News, they are still tinkering with the schedule, and there's no doubt they have dropped some of home news from the regional reporters.

I rather liked that, so am now less inclined to watch, but presumably the Aussie bloke currently steering the ship reckons his strategy will work.

Farage certainly got lots of viewers to begin with, beating Sky News and BBC News 24 combined on at least one occasion.

I reckon the execs will be underwhelmed with the overall viewing figures, but the social media engagement seems to genuinely be doing well.

Another thing none of us know is if GB News is wiping its face or meeting its financial forecasts.

The backers certainly see it as a long term project, so I don't see oblivion any time soon.

https://pressgazette.co.uk/gb-news-audience-tv-online-social-first-month/
 
OP
OP
newfhouse

newfhouse

pleb
Some of this is a bit trade anoraky, but GB News is a fascinating example of how news is broadcast in the digital age.

Time was, if you had a telly channel you either had viewers or you did not.

These days, it's all about digital engagement.

As GB News Head of Digital Rebecca Hutson says in the linked article: "I like to think of GB News as a digital media company with a news channel attached."

Thus success is judged over all platforms, including social media.

That doesn't apply just to GB News, you may have noticed Sky, particularly Sky Sports, is pushing its YouTube channel heavily.

Even dear old Auntie, which doesn't have the same commercial imperative, puts stuff on the tube, and staff almost have to have a social media presence.

Going back to GB News, they are still tinkering with the schedule, and there's no doubt they have dropped some of home news from the regional reporters.

I rather liked that, so am now less inclined to watch, but presumably the Aussie bloke currently steering the ship reckons his strategy will work.

Farage certainly got lots of viewers to begin with, beating Sky News and BBC News 24 combined on at least one occasion.

I reckon the execs will be underwhelmed with the overall viewing figures, but the social media engagement seems to genuinely be doing well.

Another thing none of us know is if GB News is wiping its face or meeting its financial forecasts.

The backers certainly see it as a long term project, so I don't see oblivion any time soon.

https://pressgazette.co.uk/gb-news-audience-tv-online-social-first-month/
Tl;dr They’re no longer interested in pretending to be a serious news operation, it’s all about clicks and shock-jockery.

And as I said in the other place, profit may not matter too much if political influence is the actual goal.
 

Pale Rider

Well-Known Member
Everyone in the media is still feeling their way in the digital age, but so called 'click bait' which some thought might be the answer is already discredited.

Genuine content is still important, which is why quite a few news organisations are recruiting journalists again after years of cutbacks and redundancies.

The motivation of the GB News backers is known only to themselves, but media companies generally want to turn a profit, not least because the large plcs have shareholders who demand it.
 

Beebo

Senior Member
Do they not still have an obligation to provide balance?
A radio station like LBC does that across the day with various presenters, most of whom are serious journalists.
How will GB news provide such balance.
 

Pale Rider

Well-Known Member
Do they not still have an obligation to provide balance?
A radio station like LBC does that across the day with various presenters, most of whom are serious journalists.
How will GB news provide such balance.

It has been and continues to do so.

I think you are correct that Ofcom say balance doesn't mean every politically charged statement must be immediately followed with the contrary view.

Owen Jones (leftie gobshite?) made a statement to say GB News had been on to him several times to be on the channel, but he refused.

There's only so much effort one can make in terms of leading a horse, or rather a donkey, to water.

Far too much has been made of GB News' right wing slant by people who've never listened to it.

Much of the output is innocuous in that regard.

Listen to Simon McCoy and Kirsty Gallacher at breakfast and you'd be hard pressed to tell the difference between their programme and those broadcast by the likes of the BBC and Sky.
 

mjr

Active Member
Listen to Simon McCoy and Kirsty Gallacher at breakfast and you'd be hard pressed to tell the difference between their programme and those broadcast by the likes of the BBC and Sky.
Listen? More technical problems with the pictures, or have they given up on video entirely?

And I'm not sure what it would tell me if three right-wing news outlets were indistinguishable.
 

Pale Rider

Well-Known Member
Listen? More technical problems with the pictures, or have they given up on video entirely?

And I'm not sure what it would tell me if three right-wing news outlets were indistinguishable.

Most of the made up complaints relate to what is said, rather than what is shown.

No doubt had I posted 'watch GBNews' you'd be asking if the microphones were broken.

What listening (and watching) all three outlets would tell you is that none of them are so biased as to require regulation, or all three need it.

By the way, the BBC being 'right wing' will be news to an awful lot of of people.
 

Rusty Nails

Upright Member
Listen to Simon McCoy and Kirsty Gallacher at breakfast and you'd be hard pressed to tell the difference between their programme and those broadcast by the likes of the BBC and Sky.

I read today that there are rumours of several of the presenters who come from a journalistic background are on the verge of quitting.

Simon McCoy and Kirsty Gallacher (although it is stretching it a bit to say she has a journalistic background) were two names mentioned.

Only rumours as yet, but so was Andrew Neil's leaving.
 
By the way, the BBC being 'right wing' will be news to an awful lot of of people.

No doubt it's true that many would not accept the BBC was right wing. But there is also a significant cohort who assert exactly that referencing to known leanings of some of it's senior political correspondents and its treatment of, amongst others Jeremy Corbyn.

It's a debating point, nothing more.
 

mjr

Active Member
No doubt it's true that many would not accept the BBC was right wing. But there is also a significant cohort who assert exactly that referencing to known leanings of some of it's senior political correspondents and its treatment of, amongst others Jeremy Corbyn.

It's a debating point, nothing more.
I know about the ex-Conservative-party member journalists but personally I noticed it had veered to the right from the ridiculing of George Osborne and embracing of Nigel Farage.

Of course, GB has embraced Farage far more than the BBC ever did, but it's also a smaller voice.
 
OP
OP
newfhouse

newfhouse

pleb
I think the BBC has been, until recently, more establishment and (small c) conservative than right wing.

The threat now is more about the management and oversight than the talent. That’s where the current government are seeking to gain control, Orban/Erdogan style.

See also the blatant threat to Channel 4.
 
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