Tyre Nichols.

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Beebo

Veteran
A young black man beaten to death by 5 police officers in Tennessee.

Nothing new here, except all 5 officers were also black.

Video footage is going to be released soon. This can’t be put down to a black and white issue.

It’s just plain police brutality. why do the police still beat a man to death when they have body cameras on?
 

multitool

Shaman
I think it is still, somewhat counterintuitively, a racist issue regardless of the colour of the perpetrators. The key is whether those men would have beaten a white person to death. I think the answer is not, but they felt empowered to do so to a black man because of the disenfranchised position black people occupy within US society.
 
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Bazzer

Well-Known Member
It’s just plain police brutality. why do the police still beat a man to death when they have body cameras on?
I suspect they forget they have them and therefore their real life behaviours come to the fore.
Having conducted interviews which were recorded and the recording equipment was clear visible, being on the table between myself and a colleague on one side, and those I was speaking to on the other side, I found it remarkably easy to forget after a few minutes the recording equipment was active.
 

BoldonLad

Old man on a bike. Not a member of a clique.
Location
South Tyneside
I suspect they forget they have them and therefore their real life behaviours come to the fore.
Having conducted interviews which were recorded and the recording equipment was clear visible, being on the table between myself and a colleague on one side, and those I was speaking to on the other side, I found it remarkably easy to forget after a few minutes the recording equipment was active.

Hopefully, your suspicions are correct. The alternative is to suspect that despite the video evidence, they felt empowered to behave in this despicable way.
 
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Beebo

Beebo

Veteran
Hopefully, your suspicions are correct. The alternative is to suspect that despite the video evidence, they felt empowered to behave in this despicable way.

It staggers me that none of them thought they should stop after the first couple of kicks to the head. Not one.
What are they taught at training.
 
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I would imagine pack mentality had kicked in by then. I take your point though. This wasn't a 'one punch' assault that resulted in a death (not that that would be acceptable either). It was a prolonged assault that at any point any one of them could have either stopped himself or called on the others to stop. Poor training? A police culture that encourages officers to see any potential arrestee as not worthy of decent treatment? If the full footage is as damning as this looks, I think the defence will run along 'heat of the moment' and blame shifting 'that's how we were taught to do it' lines.
 
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Bazzer

Well-Known Member
I would imagine pack mentality had kicked in by then. I take your point though. This wasn't a 'one punch' assault that resulted in a death (not that that would be acceptable either). It was a prolonged assault that at any point any one of them could have either stopped himself or called on the others to stop. Poor training? A police culture that encourages officers to see any potential arrestee as not worthy of decent treatment? If the full footage is as damning as this looks, I think the defence will run along 'heat of the moment' and blame shifting 'that's how we were taught to do it' lines.
From footage I have seen, which is both from the officers' recorders, as well as the CCTV, (not the complete footage from both sources), it is an appalling sustained attack.
Two deputies have also been suspended and I would imagine that further charges will follow to those already sacked, with offences in addition to the half dozen or so with which they have already been charged.
I am sure their training manuals cover how the Tennessee police should react to the different scenarios they are likely to encounter with motorists, but generally speaking I would think American police dragging someone from a car after it has first stopped was a less common means of apprehending the driver. Certainly from videos I have seen of patrol car officers conducting traffic stops, even ones involving the vehicle being chased, the primary concern of the officer is being shot from the stopped vehicle. So the approach tends to follow a safer pattern rather than a headlong charge to the driver's door.
 
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