The NACA Music, Art & General Creativity Thread

matticus

Über Member
As a sometimes bothyist there are few sights more dispiriting, as you settle down in front of a fire of an evening after a long day in the remote hills, than the sight of company trudging in across the moor with the silhouette of a guitar case distinctive against the evening sky.
Several hours later:
"..and this one's a wee dirge I composed in memory of my dear old mam.."

I would have thought the key word in your predicament is "FIRE".
 

winjim

Welcome yourself into the new modern crisis
I would have thought the key word in your predicament is "FIRE".

Guitars are made of wood, you mean?
 

Ian H

Über Member
As a sometimes bothyist there are few sights more dispiriting, as you settle down in front of a fire of an evening after a long day in the remote hills, than the sight of company trudging in across the moor with the silhouette of a guitar case distinctive against the evening sky.
Several hours later:
"..and this one's a wee dirge I composed in memory of my dear old mam.."

Norman Welch was The Axminster Music man in the 70s. He was a road sweeper and self-taught* accordion player. He raised thousands of pounds for charity because people would pay him to stop or move on. I still remember the strange wheezing noises he coaxed out of his accordion. People would sometimes amuse themselves trying to guess the tune.
*a loose description
 

BoldonLad

Old man on a bike. Not a member of a clique.
Location
South Tyneside
Norman Welch was The Axminster Music man in the 70s. He was a road sweeper and self-taught* accordion player. He raised thousands of pounds for charity because people would pay him to stop or move on. I still remember the strange wheezing noises he coaxed out of his accordion. People would sometimes amuse themselves trying to guess the tune.
*a loose description

We have a guy like that ‘busking’ at a metro station in Newcastle. He ‘plays’ guitar and ‘sings’ to raise money for charity. Fortunately, his audience do not usually have to endure too long, since they are mostly rushing to/from the metro trains.
 

Rusty Nails

Upright Member
We had Toy Mic Trev in Cardiff, sadly now dead, who sang outside Boots in Queen Street for years.

He was a master of the Pub Singer style immortalised by Billy Connolly.

Toy-Mic-Trev-Queen-Street-2005.jpg
 

Mugshot

Über Member
We had Toy Mic Trev in Cardiff, sadly now dead, who sang outside Boots in Queen Street for years.

He was a master of the Pub Singer style immortalised by Billy Connolly.

View attachment 2020

Frankie Lodge was our busker of choice in Newport.

https://www.southwalesargus.co.uk/n...ge-famous-newport-street-singer-dies-aged-90/

At the time, several workers told the Argus Mr Lodge’s singing was “a pain in the backside” and “a real nuisance”, but luckily for Mr Lodge and the 80,000 followers he claimed to have, some fans in high places were able to save his career.

The CPS later presented Mr Lodge – who was famous for not knowing the lyrics to his songs – with a book of songs from the 1930s.
 

AndyRM

Elder Goth
We have a guy like that ‘busking’ at a metro station in Newcastle. He ‘plays’ guitar and ‘sings’ to raise money for charity. Fortunately, his audience do not usually have to endure too long, since they are mostly rushing to/from the metro trains.

I know the guy you mean. Painful.
 

Badger_Boom

New Member
For years there was an old guy who performed out of tune songs on guitar and harmonica accompanied by his howling dog in the manner of Pink Floyd’s Seamus. Then one day his canine companion wasn’t there but he bravely soldiered on.

But even he wasn’t as irritating as York’s Purple Electric Violin Man.
 
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